Daily Archive: February 11, 2019

Is Debt China’s Achilles Heel?

China’s credits to various countries along its much-discussed Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), the most ambitious infrastructure undertaking in history, have recently been criticized for drawing poor countries into a debt trap by extending huge credits. Myanmar is often cited, as well as Sri Lanka. Malaysia and Pakistan are renegotiating multi-billion-dollar projects of previous regimes. What is not widely being...

The Japanese-German Alliance Against “America First” Might Backfire Badly

Japan just teamed up with Germany against Trump. Prime Minister Abe hosted Chancellor Merkel earlier this week and committed to enhancing what he described as the “alliance of multilateralists” that exists between their countries and especially them personally. These two Great Powers are against Trump’s “America First” ideology of prioritizing his country’s interests in all foreign policy and economic decisions...

The Method in Venezuela’s Oil Strategy Madness

A 2014 Petroleum Economist report on Venezuela’s Orinoco Belt concluded where it might have begun: “A crucial question that the (Venezuelan) government has skirted is how its Orinoco Belt plans would fit within OPEC’s production quotas. Venezuela has been one of the cartel’s most hawkish members, urging tighter production quotas to keep prices above $100/b. An aggressive production expansion as planned in the Orinoco Belt...

The German Soldiers of World War II: Why They Were the Best, and Why They Still Lost

The German soldiers of World War II have often been portrayed, both during the war and in the decades since, as simple-minded, unimaginative and brutish. Hollywood movies and popular U.S. television shows have for years contrasted confident, able and “cool” American GIs with slow-witted, cynical and cruel Germans. “Propaganda is an inescapable ingredient of modern conflict,” British journalist and historian...