Why’s the Polish Government Pushing Pro-Ukrainian Propaganda in Hungary?

It’s very scandalous that Poland launched this campaign against Hungary, which used to be its ideological ally in the EU until the US forced its European vassals to choose between it and Russia, which prompted Warsaw to go with Washington while Budapest has done its best to balance between both Great Powers.

Hungary Today reported that Polish Ambassador Sebastian Keciek and his Ukrainian counterpart Lyubov Nepop jointly launched Warsaw’s “Stop Russia Now!” billboard campaign in Budapest. It was initially announced late last month by Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki, who boasted at the end of March that Poland set the global standard for Russophobia, and will reportedly feature billboards on cars all throughout the capital for just a few days before going to 18 other countries throughout the course of this campaign. The images are intended to depict what life was like before and after the commencement of Russia’s ongoing special military operation. Hungary Today quoted Morawiecki as previously admitting that it’s deliberately intended to play on people’s consciences.

It’s very scandalous that Poland launched this campaign against Hungary, which used to be its ideological ally in the EU until the US forced its European vassals to choose between it and Russia, which prompted Warsaw to go with Washington while Budapest has done its best to balance between both Great Powers. I predicted in late March that “Sharp Polish-Hungarian Differences Over Russia Threaten The Visegrad Group’s Unity” and that “Orban Won’t Forget His Foreign Political Opponents If He Wins Re-Election Again”, which ultimately came to pass following the Hungarian premier’s re-election last month. Polish Grey cardinal Jaroslaw Kaczynski then condemned Viktor Orban for his balanced foreign policy, which actually only discredited the former’s faux conservative-sovereigntist credentials.

It therefore isn’t surprising that Poland is now waging an infowar campaign against its former ally in an attempt to manipulate public perception against him. The whole purpose of the “Stop Russia Now!” campaign, as Morawiecki himself admitted, is to play on people’s consciences. In this context, it’s meant to get them to turn against Orban by possibly provoking the anti-government opposition into protesting in support of reversing Budapest’s policies of refusing to allow the transit of arms to Kiev through its territory and standing firm against Brussels’ plans to cut off Russian energy imports. This meddling complements that which Kiev has already undertaken in an attempt to manipulate last month’s vote according to Budapest and its latest fearmongering claims that Hungary wants to annex Zakarpattia.

The end result is that the Polish-Ukrainian geopolitical alliance, which could prospectively even include Poland’s annexation of Western Ukraine according to Russian spy chief Sergey Naryshkin and which is based upon Warsaw’s own public proposal in mid-March to lead a so-called “peacekeeping” mission there, has replaced the prior Polish-Hungarian ideological alliance. This was entirely Poland’s prerogative since it could have in theory balanced between Hungary and Ukraine in order to advance its interests vis-à-vis Brussels and Moscow respectively but chose to throw Budapest under the bus for political convenience in order to virtue signal support for its American overlord. Poland’s new infowar on Hungary suggests that an ideological Cold War might have already begun within Central Europe.

Poland plans to mislead genuine conservative-sovereigntists within the region into following its faux model on an anti-Russian pretext that simply disguises a less visibly extreme form of liberal-globalism, while Hungary hopes to hang on to its genuine conservative-sovereigntist gains alongside inspiring others to emulate its effective model in order to maximize their strategic autonomy. The game’s rigged against Budapest though since Warsaw can count on Washington’s support in this ideological Cold War, but it’s unclear whether Poland’s model is sincerely appealing to a critical mass within the region or not. Hungary’s appears to be much more popular among the masses and might become the catalyst for regional political change with time if the US doesn’t rig regional elections against allied political forces.


By Andrew Korybko
Source: OneWorld

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